Guardian Unlimited Arts

Guardian Unlimited Arts

Latest art and design news, comment and analysis from the Guardian
  1. ‘The town of Vrindavan is a magnet for bereaved women. Elderly widows come to this square to die in the sun’

    One day in 1994, while staying in Vrindavan, a small town in Uttar Pradesh, I went exploring on my own. I came upon a quiet square. It was midday and the Indian heat was sweltering. I saw a woman lying alone, swaddled in fabric. In the background of this shot, you can see a bundle of clothes. That’s her.

    I moved towards her and saw she was dying. She was extremely old and clearly in her final moments. I went to fetch her some water when a group of children appeared. They thought nothing of it. They explained that elderly women and widows often come here to die. She could no longer talk.

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  2. Centre for contemporary photography will take ground floor of new building in Whitechapel due for completion in 2018

    A new photography gallery is to open in the East End of London, the first overseas branch of Sweden’s Fotografiska, founded in Stockholm in 2010.

    Fotografiska will take the entire ground-floor area of a new building in Whitechapel, close to the acclaimed Whitechapel Gallery, according to an announcement from the property investment company Derwent.

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  3. Picture editor, writer and key figure in the world of photojournalism who believed that the way to oppose war was to show its full horror

    John Morris, who has died aged 100, was a leading figure in the photojournalism of his native US and in his adopted homeland, France. His career included spells at Life magazine, the Washington Post, the New York Times and National Geographic, and his close association with Magnum Photos dated almost to its foundation in Paris in 1947. In addition, Morris was a prolific reporter on his own life and times, producing more than a dozen books, including two autobiographies and what he described as “a personal history of photojournalism”, Get the Picture (1998).

    A lifelong Quaker and pacifist, Morris believed that the way to oppose war was to change minds by showing its full horror. It was at Morris’s insistence that graphic images of the Vietnam war taken by two Associated Press photographers made the front page of the New York Times: in 1968, Morris challenged official policy and the supposed requirements of good taste with Eddie Adams’s image of a Vietcong prisoner at the moment of his execution by a South Vietnamese police officer; and in 1972 he used a similarly arresting image by Huynh Cong (“Nick”) Ut, of a naked nine-year-old Vietnamese girl fleeing the US napalm attack that had burned off her clothes.

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  4. Nominations for 2017 highlight designers’ contributions to protest movements, gender campaigns and humanitarian issues

    The knitted pink pussyhat, a pro-European Union poster campaign and a lending library of protest banners have been named some of the best designs of the year by the Design Museum in London, part of a 60-strong list that reflects a tumultuous time of global political unrest and creative popular resistance.

    The nominations represent the most politically charged and socially engaged selection of projects on the tenth anniversary of the Beazley awards. The selections highlight designers’ role in activist movements and the power of images and objects in disseminating campaign messages.

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  5. From mystical mountains to snowy passes, from samurai swordsmen to sex workers in shop windows, two woodblock artists in the 1830s depicted the astonishing sights on the ancient route from Edo to Kyoto

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  6. Memoir discovered among possessions after his death in 2007 to be published with preface by friend David Hockney

    David Hockney has condemned “vicious” attacks by art critics on his late friend and fellow artist RB Kitaj, who is taking revenge on them from beyond the grave in a memoir to be published in September.

    The memoir was found among Kitaj’s possessions after his death in 2007 and, in the preface, Hockney expresses dismay over the critics’ treatment of his lifelong friend, who was born in the US.

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  7. Ward Roberts shot sunbathers and distant buildings at New York’s Far Rockaway beach, rebuilt after Hurricane Sandy. But where are the waves?

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  8. There are more than a million bomb shelters in Israel, reflecting the nation’s collective siege mentality. But fear of doomsday hasn’t stopped people adapting them into gyms, rehearsal rooms and even dance class venues

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  9. Grade II*-listed Sandycombe House in Twickenham, described as painter’s only 3D work of art, now open to the public

    In an area of west London where the homes of wealthy people are constantly expanding, sprouting vast roof, cellar and garden extensions, one house has shrunk at enormous expense.

    Related:JMW Turner’s Stonehenge: ancient stones and bloodthirsty skies

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  10. The island nation of Guam in the Pacific Ocean is a target of North Korean threats against the US, which maintains several military bases there. But for Guam’s residents and tourists, life goes on despite the escalating rhetoric

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