Guardian Unlimited Arts

Guardian Unlimited Arts

Latest art and design news, comment and analysis from the Guardian
  1. Stone slab above his grave in Figueres will be removed on Thursday evening to allow experts to take DNA samples

    The remains of Salvador Dalí are due to be exhumed on Thursday evening, almost three decades after his death, to help settle a long-running paternity claim from a 61-year-old fortune-teller who insists she is the Spanish artist’s only child.

    Dalí, who died in 1989, is buried in a crypt beneath the museum he designed for himself in his home town of Figueres, Catalonia.

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  2. In 1964 my friend David Newell-Smith, who has died aged 80, became a staff photographer on the Observer and married Sonya Hirsch, a freelance photographer.

    During his 14 years with the paper, he covered many historic events, including the student protests in Paris in 1968. One of his shots of the événements was among those chosen to mark the Observer’s 225th anniversary last year.

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  3. Retiring head packer Steve Peters, finishing up after 35 years, announces Peter Smeeth as the Archibald packing room prize winner at the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney, for his portrait of television personality Lisa Wilkinson.

    The $1,500 prize, picked from the Archibald finalists announced the same day, is judged by the gallery staff who hang the exhibition. Peters maintains the prize should be awarded to a portrait ‘that’s good and looks just like the sitter’.

    Wilkinson says finding enough time to sit still for Smeeth was a challenge but, ‘he’s definitely captured me’.

    • Archibald prize 2017: Gillian Triggs, Robert Forster and Lisa Wilkinson – in pictures

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  4. From squats to shops selling logger boots, from clapped-out wooden houses to neon hotspots, photographer Fred Herzog blazed a trail for colour as he captured half a century of change in the Canadian metropolis

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  5. Anh Do, Tony Albert, actor Dee Smart and an elusive painter by the name of ‘what’ are among the 43 artists vying for this year’s Archibald prize, alongside Albert Namatjira’s great-grandson Vincent and a group of boys from a Sydney primary school. Last year was the first time artist gender parity had been reached in the Archibald’s 95 years but this year it’s a different story: of the 43 artists – chosen by the gallery’s board of trustees – only 14 are women (15, if you include ‘what’); and, of the 45 subjects, only 19 are women. Six of those are self-portraits. Actor/director John Bell got two portraits and, for the second year, Robert Hannaford and his daughter Tsering are going head-to-head, after both being finalists in 2015.

    The $100,000 prize is announced on 28 July, along with the $50,000 Wynne landscape prize, and the $40,000 Sulman prize for subject, genre or mural painting. The finalists are exhibited at the Art Gallery of NSW before a regional tour.

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  6. The biggest truck-lift in Europe, built by Richard Rogers for the British Museum, is vying with a gloriously ungaudy pier and a Glasgow tower that thinks it’s a town. Read our critic’s take on the full shortlist here

    Hastings’ revived seaside pier will go head to head with a stealthy addition to the British Museum and a photographer’s concrete studio in west London in the race to win the RIBA Stirling prize for the UK’s best new building. They are joined on a diverse shortlist by a new visitor centre at Chatham’s historic naval dockyard, a little brick tower of six apartments in east London and a gargantuan complex for the City of Glasgow College – the second year running that the young institution has made the shortlist.

    Last year, the handsome riverside campus for its maritime faculty was designed by Reiach and Hall and Michael Laird. Now the further education college is back in the spotlight with a project by the same architects, who have squeezed an entire town into a 60,000-sq-metre building in the city centre. Sharing a similar stripped back architectural language, with grids of crisp aluminium mullions and marching colonnades of sharp white concrete columns, the £162m 10-storey complex houses everything from salons and industrial kitchens to film studios and aircraft cabins to train its 30,000 students in myriad technical and vocational skills. Arranged around a vast atrium and an external courtyard, with a high street frontage and a big public staircase spilling on to a planned park, this gleaming temple to practical skills has the noble civic presence worthy of a small national parliament.

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  7. Flats with wicker balconies and Chatham Historic Dockyard among finalists RIBA architecture prize 2017


    A block of flats with wicker balconies, a dockyard redevelopment and a new college campus will be among the competitors for the UK’s most prestigious architecture prize.

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  8. Auction house is boosted by Asian demand as well as lots including £44m Brancusi and £36m Beckmann in first half of year

    Demand among wealthy art lovers for high-value lots, including work by Constantin Brancusi and Max Beckmann, and record spending from Asian buyers boosted Christie’s auction house in the first half of the year.

    The number of artworks sold for more than £10m rose to 38 in the first six months of 2017, from 14 in the same period last year.

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  9. A study suggests that 40% of us cannot tell a digitally manipulated picture from an untouched one. The Guardian’s head of photography tells what to look out for

    One of the perils of picture editing in the digital age is finding yourself duped by a fake image or a photo that has been manipulated. Guardian picture editors scan up to 30,000 images a day – often selecting at pace those that seem worthy of publication – especially when feeding the hungry beast that is the Guardian website.

    But, as a University of Warwick study has discovered, spotting a fake is a tricky task, made almost impossible by the sophistication of artistic tools now available to a skilled photo manipulator.

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  10. ‘The temperature can drop to -60C in parts of Siberia, and the ghosts of Stalin’s labour camps are everywhere. For me, these twins represent resilience’

    I met these brothers in Yakutsk, in north-eastern Siberia. They remind me of all the things I’ve shared with my own identical twin brother: the kind of symbiotic relationship all twins have. They love each other. They’re holding each other – and holding on to each other. They have almost become one.

    I was there to photograph the Road of Bones, the 2,031km highway that stretches from Yakutsk to Magadan in far-east Russia. It draws its name from the hundreds of thousands of people who, between 1932 and 1953, were sent by Stalin to forced labour camps and whose remains are buried in its foundations. According to prisoners’ testimonies, the highway claimed one body for each tree cut down to clear the forest.

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