• Welcome back


    We are glad to announce that the site is now back online, having been out of action for several weeks due to attempts to compromise site security.
    The site administrator, Barbara LeBlanc, is also back online having been out of action for a while.

  • Registering new artists


    For the time being, please use the standard contact form to register interest to display your art on the site. It is, of course, free of charge, but for technical security reasons, we are unable to allow users to self-register.
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Watercolour is a painting technique that uses water-soluble pigments, and in some cases a paper-bonding element such as gum. It stems back to renaissance times when painters would use watercolours as an initial snapshot before engaging in a more elaborate oil painting, very much as a contemporary photographer would take a Polaroid to give him/her an idea of what the finished product would be.

Having existed in Europe for at least three centuries it only became prominent in England in the 1700s through an artist called Paul Sandby (1725-1809), one of the founder members of the Royal Academy.

JMW Turner - Scarboroough, 1825Of the many other watercolour painters of that era one of the best known is J.M.W. Turner (1725-1809) , the English romantic landscape artist. Watercolours were used as a means of quickly capturing a mood, and as such were used as a second string to many artists' bow.

Notable 19th Century watercolour painters included John Singer Sargent (1856-1925), Philip Wilson Steer (1860-1942), and Sir William Russell Flint (1880-1969) bridged across to the 20th Century. In the 20th Century watercolour came popular in its own right, and artists would often be dedicated to that medium alone, as opposed to supplementing other techniques of painting.

Watercolour is one of the most versatile means available for capturing the essence of a scene, and is able to convey much through subtlety and understatement.

  • Three Sisters
  • Expectation
  • Skull portrait of a bewitched woman
  • Spookys portraits, pencil sketches